Media CenterMedia Alert: Expert Panel to Discuss New Research on Social Integration of Refugees Amid Global Crisis

Photo courtesy of Matthieu Alexandre/Caritas Internationalis

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Nikki Gamer
Catholic Relief Services
[email protected]
(443) 955- 7125

 

BALTIMORE, MD, November 2, 2017 –Catholic Relief Services (CRS) will hold a panel discussion with members of the U.S. humanitarian community on the grave repercussions a lack of social integration can have on refugees in host communities. The group will look at possible policy and humanitarian solutions at a time when 22 million refugees have been forcibly displaced from their homes. New research suggests that not addressing social integration can have life and death consequences for refugees who are often discriminated against in their ability to access medical care, housing, education, and other essential services. The panel will discuss a new report recently released by CRS that puts forth recommendations for governments, policy makers, and aid organizations to improve conditions for both refugees and the communities hosting them. 

WHAT: Panel discussion with members of the U.S. aid community on finding long-term solutions to the global refugee crisis. 

WHO: Speakers include:

  • Jennifer Poidatz, Catholic Relief Services; Vice President for Humanitarian Response
  • Mark Yarnell, Refugees International; Senior Advocate/UN Liaison
  • Giulia McPherson, Jesuit Refugee Service; Director of Advocacy and Operations
  • Elias Bakhash; Syrian asylum seeker & Villanova University student

WHEN: Monday, Nov. 6, 2017 at 1-2:30 pm EDT

WHERE: National Press Club, 529 14th St., NW, 13th Floor, Washington, DC 20045

RSVP: To [email protected], phone 443 955 7125

A record number of people around the world have been forced from their homes, including more than 22 million refugees. This has left resource-poor countries hosting them under enormous pressure to meet their growing long-term needs. Last year, the United Nations member states adopted the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants to address the many challenges posed by this global crisis.

In addition, organizations like Catholic Relief Services (CRS), who respond to the myriad needs of those displaced by conflict, climate change or poverty, are looking at better ways to address refugees’ long-term needs. Integrating refugees into host countries is one of the most promising paths forward, yet continues to pose challenges for all stakeholders—in both policy and practice.

One year into the two-year process laid out in the Refugee Summit’s New York Declaration, CRS’ panel will convene several peer organizations to discuss barriers to successful refugee integration along with possible solutions highlighted in its new report: “Little by Little: Exploring the Impact of Social Acceptance on Refugee Integration into Host Communities.” The report includes research on social integration of refugees in Ecuador, Jordan and India.

Read the full CRS research report.

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Catholic Relief Services is the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the United States. The agency alleviates suffering and provides assistance to people in need in more than 100 countries, without regard to race, religion or nationality. CRS’ relief and development work is accomplished through programs of emergency response, HIV, health, agriculture, education, microfinance and peacebuilding. For more information, please visit crs.org or crsespanol.org and follow CRS on social media: Facebook, @CatholicRelief@CRSnewsYouTube, Instagram and Pinterest.

Tags: refugees

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Nikki Gamer

Media Relations Manager

Nikki Gamer
November 2, 2017

Based in Baltimore, MD

Nikki is the Media Relations Manager for CRS and connects journalists to regional stories and sources related to the agency’s life-saving development work. Previously, Nikki worked as the Communications Officer for the Middle East, Europe, and Central Asia. She has covered CRS’ response to the Syrian refugee crisis and the mass displacement of...More